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We’re excited to announce the 2013 Emergency Fund grantees! Click here to see the announcement via TIME LightBox.

We’re excited to announce the 2013 Emergency Fund grantees! Click here to see the announcement via TIME LightBox.

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magnumfoundation:

Ben Lowy
MotherJones
Ben Lowy’s iLibya was featured in MotherJones as part of the MotherJones-Magnum foundation partnership. His work in Libya using an iPhone examines the scars and new hopes of the revolution-torn nation.
View the essay here.

magnumfoundation:

Ben Lowy

MotherJones

Ben Lowy’s iLibya was featured in MotherJones as part of the MotherJones-Magnum foundation partnership. His work in Libya using an iPhone examines the scars and new hopes of the revolution-torn nation.

View the essay here.

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NOTES FROM THE FIELD, Mimi Schiffman

Frisly and girlfriend Tiffany began dating their sophomore year of high school. At the time he was not comfortable sharing his undocumented status with friends. “I never saw her say anything bad about it but you have this feeling that just because you’re undocumented you’re hated.”  It was a real challenge to reveal to Tiffany that he was not getting a license or going on big trips due to his citizenship. Eventually he did tell her, and explained to her the impediments that not being born in this country presented to him including much limited job prospects, no access to financial aid for school and bleak prospects of ever becoming a legal citizen.

NOTES FROM THE FIELD, Mimi Schiffman

Frisly and girlfriend Tiffany began dating their sophomore year of high school. At the time he was not comfortable sharing his undocumented status with friends. “I never saw her say anything bad about it but you have this feeling that just because you’re undocumented you’re hated.”  It was a real challenge to reveal to Tiffany that he was not getting a license or going on big trips due to his citizenship. Eventually he did tell her, and explained to her the impediments that not being born in this country presented to him including much limited job prospects, no access to financial aid for school and bleak prospects of ever becoming a legal citizen.
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reportagebygettyimages:

Just after crossing the border between Greece and Turkey, an Afghan man prays by the railway while waiting for the train to take him to Athens.
Photographer Zalmai has documented Afghan refugees worldwide, most recently in Greece, where they are often the victims of xenophobic discrimination and abuse. 
This week, he is in New York presenting his work at several events organized by Magnum Foundation.

reportagebygettyimages:

Just after crossing the border between Greece and Turkey, an Afghan man prays by the railway while waiting for the train to take him to Athens.

Photographer Zalmai has documented Afghan refugees worldwide, most recently in Greece, where they are often the victims of xenophobic discrimination and abuse. 

This week, he is in New York presenting his work at several events organized by Magnum Foundation.

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Zalmai
New Yorker
Zalmai was recently published in New Yorker “Dreams and Dread in Afghanistan.” Read more here.  

Zalmai

New Yorker

Zalmai was recently published in New Yorker “Dreams and Dread in Afghanistan.” Read more here.  

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NOTES FROM THE FIELD, Emine Ziyatdinova

Floor Zero

Elevator doors open at the basement level. I walk down the dark hallway and knock on the door. I no longer notice how weird this place is, nor how strange that a  65 year old Russian man from Kazakhstan  invites me to enter a spacious room that is cluttered with a variety of objects, from a stuffed Tweety Bird hanging from the ceiling to religious artifacts from the Russian Orthodox Church. “All these once belonged to different people who lived in the building and moved out,” explained Yuriy. He strongly believes that our meeting is destined and he let me be present in his life. 

I met Yuriy for the first time last winter, one of my friends mentioned that he knew a psychic in Brighton Beach and gave me his phone number. Yuriy actually practices esotericism: he believes that numbers represent energy, and energy determines the nature of everything. He tells fortunes based on a person’s date of birth. Yuriy is convinced that he has a gift from God and can heal people, he is proud of himself because he, “helped two people to heal from cancer.” 

I am too skeptical to believe in all of that, but he definitely has some kind of talent and knowledge about energy. I wonder where did this former Communist party official and teacher learn so much about massage therapy, or as he calls it, “manual,” therapy.

He does various water and heat procedures to deal with his heart or varicose vein problems. He is worried to get treatment from a free clinic because he does not have any documents which show that he is legally living in the US.  

He is nostalgic about the free medical care system Soviet times, and he complains about how money rules everything in America. He still holds on to the dream he had when he came to the US, that he could build a life and rise up in society as he pours the tea sitting at the table that someone left behind in the basement where he lives. 

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NOTES FROM THE FIELD, Ben Lowy:
benlowy:

Tripoli, Libya | July 3, 2012 Young Libyans swim on a rubble strewn stone cornish during a hot summer day. #iLibya #magnumfoundatiom #emergency fund #photography #photojournalism #documentary #hipstamatic #libya #tripoli #swimmers (Taken with Instagram)

NOTES FROM THE FIELD, Ben Lowy:

benlowy:

Tripoli, Libya | July 3, 2012 Young Libyans swim on a rubble strewn stone cornish during a hot summer day. #iLibya #magnumfoundatiom #emergency fund #photography #photojournalism #documentary #hipstamatic #libya #tripoli #swimmers (Taken with Instagram)

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Saiful Huq Omi
Mother Jones and Magnum Foundation

Saiful Huq Omi, a photographer based in Dhaka, Bangladesh, first focused on Burma’s Rohingya refugees in 2009, when he began documenting their lives in Bangladesh, Malaysia, and the United Kingdom. The Rohingya—an ethnic, religious, and linguistic minority from Burma’s northern Rakhine State—have been persecuted for decades; nearly a million of them are estimated to reside in Burma, while another half million have sought refuge in Bangladesh. Smaller populations have fled to other countries.

View full photo essay on Mother Jones. 

Saiful Huq Omi

Mother Jones and Magnum Foundation

Saiful Huq Omi, a photographer based in Dhaka, Bangladesh, first focused on Burma’s Rohingya refugees in 2009, when he began documenting their lives in Bangladesh, Malaysia, and the United Kingdom. The Rohingya—an ethnic, religious, and linguistic minority from Burma’s northern Rakhine State—have been persecuted for decades; nearly a million of them are estimated to reside in Burma, while another half million have sought refuge in Bangladesh. Smaller populations have fled to other countries.

View full photo essay on Mother Jones

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Mirzoyan
Mother Jones and Magnum Foundation
The first photo essay in a series put together by Mother Jones and Magnum Foundation, featured work by Karen Mirzoyan from his project Unrecognized Islands of Caucasus. 


Five months ago, the people of South Ossetia, a Georgian breakaway province, cast votes for their next president. Russia—the territory’s controlling nation—had endorsed a candidate, but the majority went instead toformer education minister (and anti-corruption advocate) Alla Dzhioeva. But her presidency was short-lived: The Supreme Court declared the election invalid, citing polling violations, and set a do-over election date—from which Dzhioeva was barred from participating. This week, Leonid Tibilov, a former KGB agent, won the new election.
South Ossetia is one of three contested republics in the Caucasus region. Its election chaos illustrates the impasse faced by these territories: All are trying to form autonomous nations, yet they can’t build government without a stamp of approval from one of the only countries in the world that recognizes their nationhood. Their independence depends on Russia’s support.


To view entire essay, continue to Mother Jones. 

Mirzoyan

Mother Jones and Magnum Foundation

The first photo essay in a series put together by Mother Jones and Magnum Foundation, featured work by Karen Mirzoyan from his project Unrecognized Islands of Caucasus. 

Five months ago, the people of South Ossetia, a Georgian breakaway province, cast votes for their next president. Russia—the territory’s controlling nation—had endorsed a candidate, but the majority went instead toformer education minister (and anti-corruption advocate) Alla Dzhioeva. But her presidency was short-lived: The Supreme Court declared the election invalid, citing polling violations, and set a do-over election date—from which Dzhioeva was barred from participating. This week, Leonid Tibilov, a former KGB agent, won the new election.

South Ossetia is one of three contested republics in the Caucasus region. Its election chaos illustrates the impasse faced by these territories: All are trying to form autonomous nations, yet they can’t build government without a stamp of approval from one of the only countries in the world that recognizes their nationhood. Their independence depends on Russia’s support.

To view entire essay, continue to Mother Jones
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Magnum Foundation’s Emergency Fund (EF) is proud to announce the launch of an initiativewith Mother Jones to feature the work of Magnum Foundation EF photographers.In partnership with the EF, Mother Jones will publish 10 photo essays at MotherJones.com or in Mother Jones magazine, reaching a combined audience of 4 million people. Mother Jones creative director Tim J Luddy describes the new partnership as based on mutual ambition: “What documentary photographers capture in pictures – those fraught human moments in the face of adversity, outrage, or absurdity – is what Mother Jones captures in journalism. Everybody wins with this unprecedented partnership: Photography supported by the Magnum Foundation gains an expanded network with a widely-respected venue and we get to share extraordinary photo essays with our readers.”“In today’s media landscape, we need to work together to support photographers committed to doing in-depth reportage on critical issues not covered by today’s main headlines,” adds Susan Meiselas, acclaimed photographer and president of the Magnum Foundation. “Mother Jones, a publication that continues the important tradition of fearless investigative journalism, is a powerful platform for photography independently produced through the Magnum Foundation.”The first photo essay under the new partnership is online now! Karen Mirzoyan’s story “Unrecognized Islands of Caucasus,” is a series that chronicles the transitional state of unrecognized republics in a region torn apart by years of war. For more information about the Magnum Foundation-Mother Jones partnership, or to schedule an interview, please contact Elizabeth Gettelman or Emma Raynes.

Magnum Foundation’s Emergency Fund (EF) is proud to announce the launch of an initiative
with Mother Jones to feature the work of Magnum Foundation EF photographers.

In partnership with the EF, Mother Jones will publish 10 photo essays at MotherJones.com or in Mother Jones magazine, reaching a combined audience of 4 million people. Mother Jones creative director Tim J Luddy describes the new partnership as based on mutual ambition: “What documentary photographers capture in pictures – those fraught human moments in the face of adversity, outrage, or absurdity – is what Mother Jones captures in journalism. Everybody wins with this unprecedented partnership: Photography supported by the Magnum Foundation gains an expanded network with a widely-respected venue and we get to share extraordinary photo essays with our readers.”

“In today’s media landscape, we need to work together to support photographers committed to doing in-depth reportage on critical issues not covered by today’s main headlines,” adds Susan Meiselas, acclaimed photographer and president of the Magnum Foundation. “Mother Jones, a publication that continues the important tradition of fearless investigative journalism, is a powerful platform for photography independently produced through the Magnum Foundation.”

The first photo essay under the new partnership is online now! Karen Mirzoyan’s story “Unrecognized Islands of Caucasus,” is a series that chronicles the transitional state of unrecognized republics in a region torn apart by years of war. 

For more information about the Magnum Foundation-Mother Jones partnership, or to schedule an interview, please contact Elizabeth Gettelman or Emma Raynes.